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Sprint and HTC Set to Announce New Phone

Sprint announced the other day that they would be holding a press event on April 4th to unveil their latest "collaboration" with HTC. Most likely this will be to unveil a re-branded HTC One X or S that has LTE and will fly under the EVO name on Sprint's network.

At least that's my hope for a best case scenario. I'm a little more worried that Sprint will attempt to update the HTC EVO 3D. Now the EVO 3D is a fine phone, but ultimately I think 3D in general needs to go find it's quiet comfortable corner and die in peace. While the 3D gimmick (and that's all it is, a gimmick) has made for a few minutes of entertainment here and there with 3D video or 3D photos on the phone itself, I have no intention of ever taking photos in 3D or watching movies exclusively in 3D. The biggest reason I don't enjoy 3D is because it gives me headaches after viewing for extended periods of time or if I don't get to look at the image in just the right way. So no matter how "engaging" the 3D content may or may not be, my discomfort is always going to pull me out of the experience.

But this event on April 4th hopefully will give us a clearer picture of Sprint's LTE ambitions for this year. So far we have a vague idea of when and where Sprint will turn on the LTE first. So far we've been left with a "mid-2012" statement for Kansas City, Baltimore, Dallas, Atlanta and Houston as the first cities to get LTE upgrades. While great for the folks in those five cities, five cities is not exactly as extensive of a road map as this Sprint customer would like. Here's hoping that Sprint will not only add the third LTE phone to their lineup for this summer, but also expand on their LTE plans.

For now all that's left is to guess about what crazy name Sprint will give the phone. Sprint already takes the cake for worst named phone with the Samsung Galaxy S II Epic Touch 4G and HTC seems set on enforcing the "One" branding across carriers. So will we see the HTC EVO One XL 4G? Hopefully not, but only time will tell.

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